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TrichomonasFacts.com is brought to you by AllNetHealth.com and is intended to provide basic information that you can use to make informed decisions about important health issues affecting you or your loved ones. We hope that you’ll find this information about Trichomonas helpful and that you’ll seek professional medical advice to address any specific symptoms you might have related to this matter.

 

In addition to this site, we have created the "Healthpedia Network" of sites to provide specific information on a wide variety of health topics.

 

 

What is trichomonas?

How is trichomoniasis spread?

What are the signs and symptoms of infection?

How long after infection do symptoms occur?

How is trichomoniasis diagnosed?

How is trichomoniasis treated?

Can trichomoniasis be prevented?

Where can I buy home test kits for contributing factors of this condition?

 

 

What is trichomonas? (top)

Trichomonas vaginalis is a microscopic parasite found worldwide. Infection with Trichomonas is called trichomoniasis (trick-oh-moe-nye-uh-sis).

Trichomoniasis is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, mainly affecting sexually active women. In North America, it is estimated that more than 8 million new cases are reported yearly.

 

How is trichomoniasis spread?  (top)

Trichomoniasis is spread through sexual activity. Infection is more common in women who have had multiple sexual partners.

A common misbelief is that infection can be spread by a toilet seat; this isn't likely, since the parasite cannot live long in the environment or on objects.

 

What are the signs and symptoms of infection?  (top)

Women:

Signs and symptoms of infection range from having no symptoms (asymptomatic) to very symptomatic. Typical symptoms include foul smelling or frothy green discharge from the vagina, vaginal itching or redness. Other symptoms can include painful sexual intercourse, lower abdominal discomfort, and the urge to urinate.

Men:

Most men with this infection do not have symptoms. When symptoms are present, they most commonly are discharge from the urethra, the urge to urinate, and a burning sensation with urination.

 

How long after infection do symptoms occur? (top)

The normal incubation period is 4-28 days. The onset of symptoms such as vaginal or vulval pruritus and discharge is often sudden and occurs during or after menstruation as a result of the increased vaginal acidity.

 

How is infection diagnosed? (top)

Women:

Your health care provider will perform a pelvic exam to collect vaginal samples for examination. Diagnosis is most commonly made by viewing the parasite under a microscope. Culturing for the parasite is the best way to diagnose infection; results may take 3-7 days.

Men:

Diagnosis is made by collecting specimens from the urethra.  No diagnostic test is 100% accurate; mistakes can be made. Your health care provider may order additional testing to confirm the diagnosis.

 

How is trichomoniasis treated?  (top)

Your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic for you and all sexual partners you have had since becoming infected. If all current sexual partners are not treated, it is possible to become re-infected.

 

Can trichomoniasis be prevented?  (top)

Yes. Below are guidelines;

Abstain from sexual intercourse; or,

Use a latex condom properly, every time you have sexual intercourse, with every partner.

Limit your sexual partners. The more sex partners you have, the greater your risk of encountering someone who has this or other STDs.

If you are infected, your sexual partner (s) should be treated. This will prevent you from getting re-infected.

 

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